Fireworks in Grants Pass

Fireworks are prohibited within the City of Grants Pass by Title 9 of the Grants Pass Municipal Code (PDF) (9.12.270 - Prohibition of Fireworks). Retail sales, manufacturing, and storage of fireworks are also prohibited within the city limits of Grants Pass.

Public Fireworks Displays
A fun and safe alternative to setting off your own fireworks at home is to attend a professional fireworks display. These events are safe and impressive. It's less expensive too!

Additional Information
It is the desire of the Department of Public Safety to educate the public about fireworks safety and fireworks laws, with the goal of preventing firework-related injuries and destructive fires. Find more information from the Oregon State Fire Marshal's Fireworks Program.
Fireworks are Always Prohibited in these Areas

North Grants Pass Hazard Zones

North Grants Pass Wildfire Hazard Zones

South Grants Pass Hazard Zones

South Grants Pass Wildfire Hazard Zones
Independence Day (4th of July) Fireworks
Oregon legal fireworks are only allowed on July 4th between the hours of 6 p.m. and 11 p.m., except for the following areas:

  • West of Highland Avenue and Dimmick Street, north of the railroad tracks.
  • North of Interstate 5
  • Panoramic Loop Area
  • Overland Drive Area
  • Haviland Drive Area between Cloverlawn and Linden
  • All City Parks
  • All Public School Properties
  • Any area posted "NO FIREWORKS ALLOWED"
Fireworks Safety
Fireworks can be entertaining but can also be dangerous. If you choose to use fireworks, please exercise extreme caution. There are several wildfires currently being fought in Southern Oregon and Northern California. With temperatures predicted to reach 100 plus degrees through the weekend and more hot, dry weather predicted for next week, conditions are ripe for disaster should a stray spark land in any dry grass or other vegetation. People are reminded they can be held personally liable for any fires started by the use of fireworks.

  • Provide close adult supervision to children
    • 4 out of 10 people injured are children under the age of 15
  • Ignite fireworks only in clear areas away from combustible vegetation and structures
    • Fire can quickly spread through flammable or combustible materials
  • Keep a bucket of water or hose nearby
    • These can be used to quickly extinguish a fire before it spreads
    • Spent fireworks should be soaked in a bucket of water before disposing
  • Observe local laws
  • Never allow young children to play with fireworks
    • Sparklers account for 43% of injuries to children less than 5 years of age
  • Never have any portion of your body over a firework when lighting
    • Wear protective eyewear and avoid wearing loose clothing
  • Never attempt to reignite a malfunctioning firework
    • Soak the firework and dispose
  • Never light fireworks in a container, especially a glass or metal container
    • This could explode and spread shrapnel
  • Never experiment with homemade fireworks
    • These could be unpredictable and dangerous
Legal Fireworks
A legal firework is a class 1.4G consumer firework that does not:
  • Explode
  • Fly into the air
  • Travel more than 12 inches vertically
  • Travel more than 6 feet horizontally
These include such fireworks as base fountains, ground blooms, cone fountains, etc. For a visual example, check out the 4th of July brochure (PDF).

Illegal Fireworks
Illegal fireworks include such items as mortars, bottle rockets, aerial spinners, sky rockets, missile rockets, Roman candles, firecrackers, etc. Cherry bombs, silver salutes (M-100's), ash cans (M-80's), etc. are Oregon illegal explosive devices. So-called Sky Lanterns or Chinese Lanterns are extremely dangerous because they can be carried away by the wind and land anywhere.

Anyone violating Oregon fireworks statutes could face confiscation of the devices and a civil penalty of up to $500 per violation.

Pet Safety
  • Never take your pet to a firework display.
  • Never leave your pet in the car.
  • Move your pets indoors to a sheltered area. Turn on a radio to a normal volume.
  • Never leave your pet unattended outdoors, even in a fenced yard.
  • Make sure your pet is wearing an identification tag.
  • If you know your pet is distressed by loud noises, consult your veterinarian.